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IIEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, SECOND CORPS,

July 10, 1861. Lieutenant-Colonel WALKER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Corps : COLONEL: I have the honor to report that in obedience to orders I have relieved the Sixth Corps picket-line by the brigade of General Miles. The whole brigade is required for this purpose, leaving none of it for the earth-works near the Williams house. In relieving my own picket-line I shall be obliged to supply the place of the 150 men of General Miles' brigade now on that line by a detail from the front line of my division, which will somewhat weaken that front line. I think, however, that the line of earth-works can be held, even with this reduction. Respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRANCIS C. BARLOW, Brigadier-General, Commanding Dirision.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, SECOND ARMY CORPS,

July 10, 1864. Brigadier General MILES,

Commanding First Brigade: GENERAL: Your brigade will remain on its present duty probably for a tour of three days. During that time it will be under the immediate orders of the major-general commanding the corps, so far as performance of picket duty is concerned. You will please communicate with the corps commander by reports and otherwise several times daily. You will also please report to me direct anything of moment that occurs. Please inform me at once how many posts you have and how many supports and reserves, and the strength of each. You will have to make some arrangement to allow part of your men to rest and sleep. Please let me know how long a tour of duty your command will stand with the rest which you can give them. In case you should be attacked and driven in you will occupy and hold the rifle-pits near the Williams house, on the left of General Gibbon. You will direct the rations due to-morrow morning to be issued in your present position. Of course, you will strengthen your picket-line by all the means in your power. Respectfully,

FRANCIS C. BARLOW, Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, SECOND CORPS,

July 10, 1864. Lieut. Col. F. A. WALKER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Corps: COLONEL: I have the honor to report that the regiments of this divis. ion ordered to General Gibbon's command have returned, and are now in the rifle-pits which were held by a brigade of the First Division, Second Corps, which has been removed to another position. No changes have taken place in the intrenchments of this division, and no new roads have been opened since my last report. I am, colonel, very respectfully, &c.,

D. B. BIRNEY, Major-General of Volunteers,

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, SECOND ARMY CORPS,

July 10, 1864. Lieutenant-Colonel WALKER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Army Corps : Sir: During the night I complied with orders by sending all of my reserve regiments to the left, placing them in position there. As these regiments are not my most reliable troops, and are taken from each brigade, and of course not properly organized for efficient service de.. tached, I would suggest to the major general commanding corps my preference to relieving all of the First Division, taking its front, thus allowing that division to move to the left. As at present arranged my brigades are disorganized and my command is not in hand. I am, your obedient servant,

D. B. BIRNEY, Major-General of Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

July 10, 1864. Major-General BIRNEY, Commanding Third Division :

GENERAL: The major-general commanding instructs me to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of this morning, and to say that it has all along been his understanding that you had a reserve brigade, or at least a portion of a brigade, regularly organized in reserve, as the other divisions had, and not that each brigade had regiments in reserve. A similar movement to this was effected the other day, when it was believed that the brigade sent by you to the left was an organ

As such a movement was likely to occur again, it seems that it would have been better to have had such a brigade for that purpose instead of detached regiments. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRANCIS A. WALKER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

ized one.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,

July 10, 1864–8.45 a. m. General SETH WILLIAMS: All quiet during the night.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,

July 10, 1864. General WILLIAMS: All quiet during the day.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, FIFTH CORPS,

July 10, 1864. Lient. Col. FREDERICK T. LOCKE, Assistant Adjutant-General :

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that a few exchange shots were fired this morning about 3 o'clock between the pickets in front of the

left brigade of my advanced line. The fire was opened by the enemy's pickets and replied to by about fifty shots from mine, after which the line was again quiet as before. No loss occurred on our side. Occasional shots were tired from the enemy's battery opposite the right of our line, seemingly directed to the fortifications near the First Division. Some two or three were thrown to my left toward the Second Corps from a battery on the enemy's right. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. W. CRAWFORD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

ILEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, FIFTI ARMY CORPS,

July 10, 1861–2.30 p. m. General WARREN:

General Hancock desires that I should move to the left and occupy about 400 yards of the line now held by Birney. I can do this if you approve and would recommend it, as otherwise I may be called upon to send my reserve brigade to the extreme left, the whole of the Second Corps being in line at present. Respectfully,

S. W. CRAWFORD,

Brigadier-General.

General CRAWFORD:

The major-general commanding authorizes you to move up on the line now occupied by General Birney, as you propose.

FRED. T. LOCKE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

ORDERS.

HEADQUARTERS SIXTH CORPS,

July 10, 1861. The troops will at once embark in the order of their march, under the direction of the division commander. On their arrival in Washington the troops will not disembark, but the boats will remain in the stream until further orders from these headquarters. By command of Major General Wright:

C. II. WHITTELSEY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS,

July 10, 1864–9 d. m. Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff: I have the honor to report almost entire quiet along my line during the night.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS.

July 10, 1864-9 p. m. Major-General HUMPHREYS:

I have the honor to report that everything has been quiet without change on my line to-day. This evening there is some little firing.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION, NINTI ARMY CORPS,

Before Petersburg, Va., July 10, 1861. Lieutenant-Colonel RICHMOND, A. A. G., Ninth Army Corps :

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that the night has been unusually quiet on our line, and nothing worthy of note having occurred. Captain Rogers has gone into position on the artillery line with his batteries, I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT B. POTTER, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS Third DIVISION,

July 10, 1864–8 a. m. (Lient. Col. L. RICHMOND, Assistant Adjutant-General :)

COLONEL: I have the honor to report all quiet on my lines duriug the night, except in front of the left of Hartranft's brigade, where there was some musketry firing. I commenced throwing up cover for a new battery, last night, on the left of Battery Morton, for the better protection of Hartranft's left, which turns rather abruptly to the rear, exposing his line to an enfilading fire. Very, respectfully,

O. B. WILLCOX, Brigadier General, Commanding.

(JULY 10, 1864.] General FERRERO:

The commanding general directs that you send the batteries that are with

you to report to these headquarters at an eary hour in the morning, and your batteries will be sent to replace them. Yours, very respectfully,

LEWIS RICHMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTH Division, NINTI ARMY CORPS,

July 10, 1861. Lient. Col. LEWIS RICHMOND, A. A. G., Ninth Army Corps :

COLONEL: One battery was sent to you yesterday. The other one is now in position and can be relieved at any time, but I cannot send it away until it is relieved by another. I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDW. FERRERO,

Brigadier-General, Commanding. Two batteries are needed here. The orderly conveying this can guide them here, if you choose to have him wait.

ILEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 10, 1861-9.50 4. m. Major-General SHERIDAN,

Caralry Corps : A band of guerrillas is reported as infesting the old Norfolk road.

commanding general directs that they be looked after and that the other roads be well scouted.

A. A. HUMPHREYS, Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY CORPS,

July 10, 1861. Capt. C. N. TURNBULL,

Engineer Department, Army of the Potomac: General Sheridan wants fifteen pontoon boats; if he can't get that many, say twelve. The general desires you to see Major Duane, chief engineer, Army of the Potomac, and if we are to have a pontoon train have Major Duane order it here at once so that it may be put in shape.

JAS. W. FORSYTH, Lieutenant-Colonel and Chief of Staff

HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION, CAVALRY CORPS,

July 10, 1861. Col. J. I. GREGG,

Commanding Second Brigade, Second Dirision: COLONEL: In compliance with instructions from the major-general commanding Cavalry Corps, you will send a regiment from your brigade to relieve the Eighth Pennsylvania, now on duty with Colonel Bryali, at headquarters Army of the Potomac. The Eighth Pennsylvania, ol being relieved, will return to your brigade. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. MCM. GREGG, Brigadier-General of Vols., Comdg. Second Division of Caralry.

HEADQUARTERS SIEGE TRAIN,

July 10, 1861. Capt. GEORGE T. BALCH,

Assistant Chief of Ordnance: DEAR CAPTAIN: Will you please order that all ammunition shipped to me shall be sent on barges or schooners? I have orders to keep my train afloat, except the daily demands, and have no facilities for transferring from steamers to barges here. If the quartermasters understand this from the ordnance officer's all trouble will be avoided. I require about twenty sets of powder measures, a dozen gunner's levels, some dozen pounds of chalk, with a large supply of friction-primers, say 50,000, and of assorted fuses, say 20,000. Please direct them and all my train to be invoiced to Captain Hatfield. I constantly receive invoices myself. He is my acting ordnance officer, and I am reponsible for nothing personally. Your obedient servant,

HENRY L. ABBOT, Colonel First Connecticut Artillery, Commanding.

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