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appear on the roll is received. I have examined the rolls and do not find them reported as surgeons. I will state, however, as a matter of justice to those gentlemen that they are practicing physicians and şurgeons and that they have performed duty as such during their imprisonment here. Doctor Alexander, who is also here, had been appointed a surgeon prior to his surrender, but if discharged will continue on duty here with the prisoners. Respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN G. FONDA, Major Twelfth Illinois Cavalry, Commanding Post,

(Inclosure No. 5.1 Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

Sir: I was acting as assistant surgeon when captured and have been performing such duty up to this time. Would like to be released if the order releasing surgeons is applicable to my case. If released from being a prisoner of war I wish to remain here and continue my professional services as long as necessary. Yours, respectfully,

J. L. H. SESSUM. (Indorsement.]

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE, July 7, 1862. As the plea of being an acting assistant surgeon is open to abuse it should not be entertained as ground of release without other proof than the prisoner's own statement. Respectfully referred to the commissary general of prisoners for investigation and report. By order:

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

(Inclosure No. 6.)

STATE OF ILLINOIS, Sangamon County, Camp Butler :

l'ersonally appeared before me, J. G. Fonda, colonel commanding post, the undersigned, who being duly sworn depose as follows:

That Dr. S. E. Winnemore was elected private physician of Company C, First Alabama Regiment; that a few days after arriving at Island No. 10 the said Dr. S. E. Winnemore was appointed by S. W. Averett, lieutenant commanding floating battery, as surgeon of said floating battery, and that the said Dr. S. E. Winnemore was performing the duties of surgeon at the time of her abandonment, and that the said Dr. S. E. Winnemore being taken prisoner did not have time to get his commission. They furtber state that the said Dr. S. E. Winnemore has never been in any hostile attitude toward the Government of the United States.

JOHN N. CANTEY,
J. A. PRIM,
JNO. A. WOOD,
W. H. BLACKMAN,
0. T. HRABOWSKI,

JOHN BURTON,
Enlisted men of Company C, First Alabama Regiment, C. S. Army.
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 9th day of July, A. D. 1862.

JOIN G. FONDA, Major, Twelfth Illinois Caralry, Commanding Camp Butler.

(Inclosure No.7.)

SPRINGFIELD, ILL., July 10, 1862. Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN,

Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich. COLONEL: In reply to your communication of the 3d instant I have the honor to state that I have obtained such additional evidence as would confirm the statements of Doctors Winnemore and Crockett and forward it to you inclosed. Doctors Winnemore and Crockett are on duty as surgeons, each having charge of a hospital of prisoners of war. They have performed their duty faithfully and appear to be gentlemen of honesty and integrity.

S. E. Winnemore appears on the rolls as surgeon Company C, First Alabama Regiment. E. R. Crockett does not appear on the rolls. I will by this evening have completed my inspection of this camp. Will you please send me any additional instructions that may be requisite? The rolls of the prisoners of war do not appear to be well posted up. I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. FREEDLEY,

Captain, Third Infantry.

[Sub-inclosuro No. 1.)

STATE OF ILLINOIS, Sangamon County, Camp Butler :

Personally appeared before me, J. G. Fonda, colonel commanding post, R. B. Crockett, Company A, Thirtieth Tennessee Regiment, and in due form made oath that Dr. E. R. Crockett was at Fort Donelson on the 16th of February last when the fort was surrendered; that he was there waiting upon myself (R. B. Crockett), at that time sick, and that for the same reason attended me to this place; that he (the said E. R. Crockett) was a private citizen and in nowise connected with the Confederate Southern Army; that he never took up arms against the Government of the United States nor aided its enemies.

R. B. CROCKETT.

Sworn to and subscribed before me on the 9th day of July, 1862.

JOHN G. FONDA, Major, Twelfth Illinois Cavalry, Commanding Camp Butler.

[Sub-inclosure No. 2.)

CAMP BUTLER, Springfield, Ill., July 8, 1862. I certify that Dr. E. R. Crockett, confined at this camp as a prisoner of war, has been on duty as a surgeon since his arrival here and that he has performed his duties faithfully.

J. COOPER MCKEE,
Asst. Surg., U. S. Army, Supt. Prisoners' Hosvital.

DETROIT, July 12, 1862. Col. E. D. TOWNSEND:

I have no rolls of prisoners taken by the Army of the Potomac. Will call for them immediately.

W. HOFFMAN.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Detroit, July 12, 1862. General M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General U. 8. Army, Washington, D. C. GENERAL: I would respectfully inquire if I am at liberty to order supplies of clothing for prisoners of war at the Western camps and by what depots it should be furnished. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Detroit, July 12, 1862. Col. J. DIMICK,

First U.S. Artillery, Comdg. Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, Mass. COLONEL: The War Department has called for a list of all prisoners of war taken by the Army of the Potomac since its arrival on the l'eninsula, giving the State, rank, regiment and company, when captured and the place where captured. If there are any of these prisoners in your charge will you please furnish me with a list as soon as practicable: Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Detroit, July 12, 1862. Col. G. LOOMIS,

Fifth Infty., U.S. Army, Comdg. Fort Columbus, N. Y. Harbor. COLONEL: Your letter of the 6th instant with the list of prisoners from Fort Pulaski is received. The clothing which you refer to at the close of your letter is I presume in the hands of your quartermaster and is for issue to the prisoners whenever you think it proper. The War Department has called for a list of all prisoners of war taken by the Army of the Potomac since its arrival on the Peninsula, giving the State, rank, regiment and company, when captured and the place where captured. If there are any of these prisoners in your charge will you please furnish me a list as early as practicable? Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Detroit, July 12, 1862. Col. J. H. TUCKER, Commanding Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill.

COLONEL: Your letter of the 11th instant is received. To much of it my letter of last evening is a sufficient reply. In the matter of furnishing horse-carts and other articles for policing purposes I thought it was so well understood when I was at the camp that until now I had felt sure

they had all been provided and that the work of putting the camp in a wholesome state of police was by this time well in progress if not already completed. Please call upon Captain Potter for as many of these things as may be absolutely necessary. Three carts to belong permanently to the camp, with as many more hired while the necessity for active sanitary measures is so urgent, will perhaps be the best arrangement, but if more could be used to advantage have enough to perform the work promptly. I instructed Captain Potter also to purchase the portable saw-mill, but as it has not yet been done you may let that rest till we see the result of the negotiations for a general exchange of prisoners which the papers this morning announce to be in prospect of satisfactory settlement. If an exchange is agreed upon there will be no occasion for the mill. Wben I was in Chicago I promised Mrs. Bradley that I would give such orders in relation to the waste of water at the camp as would insure that her house should no longer be injured by the neglect of this matter, and I gave the necessary orders which should have protected her from the nuisance. Will you please see that proper arrangements are made inmediately to prevent such a waste of water as has been tolerated to day and to carry what is unavoidably spilt away from Mrs. Bradley's house! I beg you to have this matter attended to atonce, as there is no possible excuse why Mrs. Bradley should have suffered so seriously and so unnecessarily. Have an estimate made of the cost of laying water pipes to a more convenient point in the camp and I will refer the question to the QuartermasterGeneral. As I said at the camp I wish an estimate made of the cost of a bake house before I order its construction. I have referred the matter of moving the fence, repairing the barracks, &c., to the Quartermaster General. This work too will not be necessary if there is to be a general exchange of prisovers. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Detroit, July 12, 1862. Capt. H. W. FREEDLEY,

Eighth Infantry, U. S. Army, Springfield, Ill. CAPTAIN: Your report of the 8th is received. I inclose herewith the orders * of the War Department giving me authority to regulate the matter of the saving of rations and the regulations which I have issued in virtue of this authority. Please furnish Captain Edwards, assistant commissary of subsistence, with a copy of each, and if he refuses to be governed by them desire him to put it in writing and report to me. The contract which you sent me in the first paragraph leaves it at the option of the Government whether to receive the rations on the provision return or iu bulk. Private understanding has no force. Please say to the commanding officer, Major Fonda, that I direct the prisoners’rations to be received in bulk hereafter. The difference between what is drawn and what is due will of course be what the commissary will pay for. The Army Regulations and recent orders provide for the purchase of surplus rations. No further fencing can be erected withont authority from the Quartermaster-General. Give me the length of the

* See i'p. 30, 152.

fence you speak of and an estimate of its cost. I wish you to see the regulations which I inclose put in force. Have the returns for June made out immediately and the rolls of all prisoners completed with the least possibledelay. Report to me what their condition is at this time. I will write to you again in reply to your letter. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Detroit, July 12, 1862. Capt. J. A. POTTER, Assistant Quartermaster, Chicago, Ill.

CAPTAIN: Please furnish the clothing required in the accompanying estimates,* giving the inferior clothing you have on hand which is not suitable for issue to our own troops. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-Generar of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Detroit, July 12, 1862. Capt. A. A. GIBSON,

Second Artillery, Commanding Fort Delaware, Del. CAPTAIN: The War Department has called for a list of all prisoners of war taken by the Army of the Potomac since its arrival on the Peninsula, giving the State, rank, regiment and company, when captured and the place where captured. If there are any of these prisoners in your charge will you please furnish me a list as early as practicable? The three political prisoners which you speak of in your letter of the 4th instant will remain at Fort Delaware. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

OFFICE COMMISSARY GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Detroit, July 12, 1862. J. T. HUBBARD, Lebanon, Jo.

SIR: Your letter of the 3d instant asking that your brother-in-law, T. A. Spencer, may be released from confinement at Camp Douglas has been referred to me, and in reply I have to inform you that Mr. Spencer caunot be released unless you can establish that he was forced into the rebel service against his will. On such proof the matter would be referred to the Secretary of War and possibly he would order his release. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. TIOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

* Not found,

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