The Ills of the South: Or, Related Causes Hostile to the General Prosperity of the Southern People

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G. P. Putnam's sons, 1894 - Southern States - 277 pages
 

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Page 251 - I will say then that I am not, nor ever have been, in favor of bringing about in any way the social and political equality of the white and black races — that I am not, nor ever have been, in favor of making voters or jurors of negroes, nor of qualifying them to hold office, nor to intermarry with white people; and I will say in addition to this that there is a physical difference between the white and black races...
Page 251 - Nothing is more certainly written in the book of fate, than that these people are to be free ; nor is it less certain that the two races, equally free, cannot live in the same government.
Page 161 - Perpetuities and monopolies are contrary to the genius of a free government, and shall never be allowed, nor shall the law of primogeniture or entailment ever be in force in this state.
Page 251 - I will say in addition to this that there is a physical difference between the white and black races which I believe will for ever forbid the two races living together on terms of social and political equality.
Page 67 - All the world cries, * Where is the man who will save us? We want a man!' Don't look so far for this man. You have him at hand. This man — it is you, it is I, it is each one of us ! . . . How to constitute oneself a man ? Nothing harder, if one knows not how to will it ; nothing easier, if one wills it,
Page 55 - Chicago tied the wheat crop in his handkerchief, and held it until a sewing-woman in my city, working for ninety cents a week, had to pay him twenty cents tax on the sack of flour she bore home in her famished hands.
Page 55 - Three men held the cotton crop until the English spindles were stopped and the lights went out in 3,000,000 English homes. Last summer one man cornered pork until he had levied a tax of $3 per barrel on every consumer, and pocketed a profit of millions. The Czar of Russia would not have dared to do these things. And yet they are no secrets in this free government of ours ! They are known of all men, and, my countrymen, no argument can follow them, and no plea excuse them, when they fall on the men...
Page 175 - What the horns are to the buffalo, what the paw is to the tiger, what the sting is to the bee, what beauty, according to the old Greek song, is to woman, deceit is to the Bengalee. Large promises, smooth excuses, elaborate tissues of circumstantial falsehood, chicanery, perjury, forgery, are the weapons, offensive and defensive, of the people of the Lower Ganges.
Page 212 - The negroes in Mandeville were, perhaps, as happy in their old condition as they have been since their glorious emancipation ; and some of them to this day speak regretfully of a time when children did not die of neglect ; when the sick and aged were taken care of, and the strong and healthy were, at least, as well looked after as their owner's cattle. "Slavery could not last ; but neither can the condition last which has followed it.
Page 250 - Give room for but a single spark of real jealousy to be kindled between them, and the explosion would be instantaneous and universal. It is the most fatal of all fallacies, to suppose that these two races can exist together, after any length of time, or any process of preparation, on terms at all approaching to equality.

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