The Guide: A Novel

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Penguin, 1988 - Literary Criticism - 220 pages
15 Reviews
Raju's first stop after his release from prison is the barber's shop. Then he decides to take refuge in an abandoned temple. Raju used to be India's most corrupt tourist guide - but now a peasant mistakes him for a holy man. Gradually, he begins to play the part.
 

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R.k narayan's one of the best works.Storyline is soo gripping and it is interwoved in such way that reader interest is never lost.Although at some meagre instances there are lapses as at times protagonists spiritual life is streched way too far but protagonist raju constantly litter up the spark of your interest alive  

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this is really very nice story,specially for the bachelor's.when they read it they feel that they are passing with the same situation.

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Contents

Chapter One
3
Chapter Two
19
Chapter Three
31
Chapter Four
37
Chapter Five
47
Chapter Six
78
Chapter Seven
99
Chapter Eight
139
Chapter Nine
161
Chapter Ten
193
Chapter Eleven
207
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About the author (1988)

R. K. Narayan was born on October 10, 1906 in Madras, Brtitsh India. He graduated from Maharaja College of Mysore with a B.A. degree in 1930. All of his many novels take place in Malgudi, an imaginary town in southern India that serves as a kind of "golden mean", neither a large, impersonal city nor an obscure, isolated village, through which Narayan explores the dilemmas of modernization. For example, The Bachelor of Arts is the story of a sensitive youth caught in a conflict between Western ideas of love and marriage instilled in him by his education and the still-traditional milieu in which he lives. Malgudi is a microcosm of modern India, and throughout Narayan's novels, which span more than 50 years of India's growth, we can watch Malgudi's inhabitants evolve in precisely the same way that their hometown does. Narayan's wit and literary skill have made him a favorite with readers all over the world. He died of typhoid in 1939.

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