Communal Violence and Democratization in Indonesia: Small Town Wars

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Routledge, Jan 24, 2007 - Political Science - 184 pages

Through close scrutiny of empirical materials and interviews, this book uniquely analyzes all the episodes of long-running, widespread communal violence that erupted during Indonesia’s post-New Order transition.

Indonesia democratised after the long and authoritarian New Order regime ended in May 1998. But the transition was far less peaceful than is often thought. It claimed about 10,000 lives in communal (ethnic and religious) violence, and nearly as many as that again in separatist violence in Aceh and East Timor.

Taking a comprehensive look at the communal violence that arose after the New Order regime, this book will be of interest to students of Southeast Asian studies, social movements, political violence and ethnicity.

 

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Contents

1 Introduction
1
2 Why now? Temporal contexts
15
3 Why here? The town beyond Java
34
4 Identity formation in West Kalimantan
53
5 Escalation in Poso
72
6 Mobilization in Ambon
88
7 Polarization in North Maluku
107
8 Actor constitution in Central Kalimantan
124
9 Concluding reflections
138
Notes
147
Bibliography
157
Index
177
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Gerry van Klinken is a Research Fellow at KITLV/ Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies, The Netherlands.

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